Wissenschaftliche Publikationen

Die Generierung, Verbreitung und Anwendung von Wissen ist eine Kernaufgabe von Patientensicherheit Schweiz. Ihre wissenschaftlichen Veröffentlichungen stossen im In- und Ausland auf grosses Interesse.

Supporting health professionals after an adverse event in Swiss hospitals - a cross-sectional study

The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of organisational structures and processes for the support of second victims in Swiss hospitals.

To identify institutional policies and support for health professionals who have been involved in an adverse patient event and become traumatised from the event, also called second victims, we conducted a cross-sectional, multicentre survey study. We targeted Swiss acute care, university and psychiatric hospitals, as well as rehabilitation and speciality clinics. A 13-item questionnaire was used to collect information from hospital quality managers regarding their institutions’ policies and support practices with respect to second victims. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics.

Results
Overall, respondents from 116 hospitals completed the questionnaire (response rate 50.2%). Most institutional respondents reported both that they would like to receive information about adverse events and that their institutions offer related support. Of participating institutions, 60% indicated that they actively inform their personnel about second-victim support possibilities; however, only 31% specifically train supervisory personnel to deliver that support, and only 32% have hospital-specific guidelines in place for second victim support. University, acute care and speciality clinics were more likely to use such guidelines than psychiatric and rehabilitation clinics. Analysis indicated an association between hospital size and the existence of guidelines.

Conclusions
In Swiss hospitals, second victim support is generally prevalent, but often in an unstructured way. This lack of methodology increases the risk that, following adverse events, both the quantity and quality of support provided to health professionals will be insufficient. A firm commitment on the part of institutional leaders to implement related policies could foster the adoption of high-quality second victim guidelines in Swiss hospitals.

Source
Swiss Medical Weekly

Authors

Franziska Reiser Crelier, MSN, Institute of Nursing Science, Department Public Health, University of Basel Switzerland

Prof. Dr. David Schwappach, Swiss Patient Safety Foundation, Zurich, Switzerland and Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine (ISPM), University of Bern, Switzerland

PD Dr. René Schwendimann, Patient Safety Office, University Hospital Basel, Switzerland and Institute of Nursing Science, Department Public Health, University of Basel, Switzerland

Abstract
 


Registration and Management of Never Events in Swiss Hospitals

In Switzerland, there is no mandatory reporting of never events.The aim of this study was to explore how hospitals outside mandatory never-event-regulations identify, register, and manage never events and whether practices are associated with hospital size.

Results
Clinical risk managers representing 95 hospitals completed the survey (55% response rate). Among responding risk and quality managers, only 45% would be formally notified through a designated reporting channel if a never event has happened in their hospital. Averaged over a list of 8 specified events, only half of hospitals could report a systematic count of the number of events. Hospital size was not associated with never- event-management. Respondents reported that their hospital pays “too little attention” to the recording (46%), the analysis (34%), and the prevention (40%) of never events. All respondents rated the systematic registration and analysis of never events as very (81%) or rather important (19%) for the improvement of patient safety.

Conclusions
A substantial fraction of Swiss hospitals do not have valid data on the occurrence of never events available and do not have reliable processes installed for the registration and exam of these events. Surprisingly, larger hospitals do not seem to be better prepared for never events management.

Source
Journal of Patient Safety

Authors
Prof. Dr. David Schwappach and Dr. Yvonne Pfeiffer from Swiss Patient Safety Foundation

Abstract


Patient Safety Threats in Information Management

Cancer care is complex, involving highly toxic drugs, critically ill patients, and various different care providers. Because it is important for clinicians to have the latest and complete information about the patient available, this study focused on patient safety issues in information management developing from health information technology (HIT) use in oncology ambulatory infusion centers.

 

Objective
The aim was to exploratively and prospectively assess patient safety risks from an expert perspective: instead of retrospectively analyzing safety events, we assessed the information management hazards inherent to the daily work processes; instead of asking healthcare workers at the front line, we used them as information sources to construct our patient safety expert view on the hazards.

Methods
The work processes of clinicians in three ambulatory infusion centers were assessed and evaluated based on interviews and observations with a nurse and a physician of each unit. The 125 identified patient safety issues were described and sorted into thematic groups.

Results
A broad range of patient safety issues was identified, such as data fragmentation, or information islands, meaning that patient data are stored across different cases or software and that different professional groups do not use the same set of information.

Conclusions
The current design and implementation of HIT systems do not support adequate information management: clinicians needed to play very close attention and improvise to avoid errors in using HIT and treat cancer patients safely. It is important to take the clinical front-end practice into account when evaluating or planning further HIT improvements.

Source
Journal of Patient Safety

Authors
Dr. Yvonne Pfeiffer; Chantal Zimmermann; Prof. Dr. David Schwappach von Patientensicherheit Schweiz.

Abstract
 


What are we doing when we double check?

Double checking is often considered a useful strategy to detect and prevent medication errors, especially before the administration of high-risk drugs. From a safety research perspective, the effectiveness of double checking in preventing medication errors is limited by several factors, even if they are conducted independently.

As double checking uses considerable resources of nurses’ time and cognitive capacity, there is a pressing need to know whether existing empirical evidence supports using double checking despite its mentioned shortcomings.
We present a framework for classifying checking procedures and differentiating them from other medication-related safety behaviours in order to structure future research and practice. In addition, the concept of independence is discussed.

Source
BMJ Quality and Safety

Authors
Dr. Yvonne Pfeiffer; Chantal Zimmermann; Prof. Dr. David Schwappach von Patientensicherheit Schweiz.

Abstract
 

 


Change in staff perspectives on indwelling urinary catheter use after implementation of an intervention bundle in seven Swiss acute care hospitals

Although indwelling urinary catheters (IUCs) are commonly used in acute care hospitals, an appropriate medical indication is often missing. IUCs are associated with urinary tract infections and non-infectious complications such as haematuria and urethral injury. The reduction of IUC use is therefore a key measure to increase patient safety. To promote safe urinary catheter use in Swiss hospitals, a national QI project was developed and conducted by the Swiss Patient Safety Foundation in partnership with Swissnoso, the National Center for Infection Control.

The QI project was modelled after other successful QI initiatives in the USA.The overall project goal was to reduce IUC use and to promote safe catheter insertion and maintenance by implementing an evidence-based intervention bundle in seven Swiss acute care hospitals.With the present study, we aimed to assess the changes in staff perspectives in the participating hospitals using survey data collected before and after implementation of the intervention bundle.

Conclusion
Changing staff attitudes, knowledge and behaviour are important prerequisites for an effective reduction of catheter use and catheter-associated complications. We found small but significant changes in staff perceptions after implementation of an evidence-based intervention bundle. The positive trends were present in all subgroups, indicating that regardless of responsibilities and practice of catheter placement, perspectives on urinary catheter use changed over time. Efforts now need to be targeted at reinforcing and sustaining these changes, so that restrictive use of IUCs becomes an integral part of the hospital culture.

Source
BMJ Open

Authors
Andrea Niederhauser, Stephanie Züllig, Jonas Marschall, Alexander Schweiger, Gregor John, Stefan P Kuster, David LB Schwappach on behalf of the progress! Safe Urinary, Catheterization Collaboration Group

Abstract


Speaking up about patient safety in psychiatric hospitals

The aim of this study was to examine speak up‐related behaviour and climate for the first time in psychiatric hospitals. A cross‐sectional survey was conducted among healthcare workers (HCWs) in six psychiatric hospitals with nine sites in Switzerland.

Conclusions
Speaking up for patient safety is an important topic in the psychiatric healthcare setting. Speaking up to prevent harm to patients should be further promoted in psychiatric clinics as an important safety measure. In order to fully enact their role as advocates for patient safety, nurses should be empowered to voice concerns even in difficult situations. Further research is needed to gain more insights into the complex trade‐offs and considerations that influence decisions to speak up or withholding voice in the psychiatric healthcare setting.

Source
International Journal of Mental Health Nursing

Authors
David L. B. Schwappach PhD, MPH; Andrea Niederhauser MPH

Abstract

 

 


Case Study: More Patient Safety by Design–System

Many of the more recent initiatives to improve patient safety target the behavior of health care staff (e.g., training, double-checking procedures, and standard operating procedures). System-based interventions have so far received less attention, even though they produce more substantial improvements, being less dependent on individuals’ behavior. One type of system-based intervention that can benefit patient safety involves improvements to hospital design. Given that people’s working environments affect their behavior, good design at a systemic level not only enables staff to

 work more efficiently; it can also prevent errors and mishaps, which can have serious consequences for patients.While an increasing number of studies have demonstrated the effect of hospital design on patient safety, this knowledge is not easily accessible to clinicians, practitioners, risk managers, and other decision-makers, such as designers and architects of health care facilities. This is why the Swiss Patient Safety Foundation launched its project, «More Patient Safety by Design: Systemic Approaches for Hospitals», which is presented in this chapter.

Source
Advances in Health Care Management

Authors
Irene Kobler, Prof. Dr. Alfred Angerer, Prof. Dr. David Schwappach, MPH

Abstract

 


Speaking up culture: Need of faculty working in patient safety

Speaking up behaviour of students was assessed for the first time in an Austrian academic teaching hospital. The higher the term the more frequent students reported perceived patient safety concerns or rule violations and withholding voice. These results suggest the need to adapt the curriculum concept of the faculty in order to address patient safety as a relevant topic.

 

Results
326 individuals completed the questionnaire (response rate 24%). 37% of responders were in their 5th- 6th clinical term, 32% were in their 7th-8th term and 31% were in the 9th-12th term. 69% of students had a specific safety concern in the past four weeks, 48% had observed an error and 68% noticed the violation of a patient safety rule. Though students perceived specific patient safety concerns, 56% did not speak up in a critical situation. All predefined barriers seemed to play an important role in inhibiting students’ voicing concerns. The scores on the psychological safety scale were overall moderately favourable. Students felt little encouraged by colleagues and, in particular, by supervisors to speak up.

Conclusion
Speaking up behaviour of students was assessed for the first time in an Austrian academic teaching hospital. The higher the term the more frequent students reported perceived patient safety concerns or rule violations and withholding voice. These results suggest the need to adapt the curriculum concept of the faculty in order to address patient safety as a relevant topic.

Source
PLOS ONE

Authors
David Schwappach, Gerald Sendlhofer, Lars-Peter Kamolz, Wolfgang Köle, Gernot Brunner

Abstract
 


Perioperative Hypothermie vermeiden

Das unbeabsichtigte Absinken der Körpertemperatur unter 36 Grad Celsius stellt für alle chirurgischen Patientinnen und Patienten ein Risiko dar und kann gravierende Folgen für die Patientensicherheit haben.

Ziel der Leitlinie ist es, den Fachpersonen in der chirurgischen Versorgung zu helfen, eine unbeabsichtigte perioperative Hypothermie zu vermeiden. Sie enthält evidenzbasierte Empfehlungen sowie konkrete Massnahmen zur Implementierung und Umsetzung.

Die Leitlinie ist im Verbund der klinischen Fachgesellschaften in Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz und unter Federführung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Anästhesiologie und Intensivmedizin e.V. (DGAI) entstanden. Prof. Dr. David Schwappach, wissenschaftlicher Leiter bei Patientensicherheit Schweiz, hat bei der Erarbeitung mitgewirkt.

Source
AWMF online

Autoren
Federführende Fachgesellschaft: Deutsche Gesellschaft für Anästhesiologie und Intensivmedizin e.V. (DGAI)

Beteiligung weiterer Fachgesellschaften/Organisationen:

Schweizerische Gesellschaft für Anästhesiologie und Reanimation (SGAR)

Österreichische Gesellschaft für Anästhesiologie, Reanimation und Intensivmedizin (ÖGARI)

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Fachkrankenpflege und Funktionsdienste e. V., DGF

Stiftung Patientensicherheit Schweiz

Leitlinie

 


Sicherheitsrelevante Medikationsprozesse in Schweizer Alters- und Pflegeheimen

Die Reduktion von unerwünschten Arzneimittelereignissen bei Bewohnenden von Alters- und Pflegeheimen ist ein zentrales Anliegen der Patientensicherheit. Ziel dieser Studie war es zu ermitteln, wie häufig ausgewählte Medikationsprozesse zur Erhöhung der Medikationssicherheit in Schweizer Pflegeheimen bereits umgesetzt werden und wie sich Heime, die diese Prozesse noch nicht umsetzen, durch organisationale Merkmale charakterisieren lassen.

 

Ergebnisse
Es nahmen 420 von 1525 eingeladenen Personen an der Befragung teil (Rücklaufquote: 27.5%). Davon gaben 65.0% an, dass in ihrer Einrichtung eine regelmäßige systematische Überprüfung der Medikation vorgesehen ist. In 9.5% der Pflegeheime wird eine Liste zur Identifikation von potenziell inadäquater Medikation eingesetzt und 6.7% der Heime haben einen standardisierten Prozess, um Nebenwirkungen von Medikamenten zu überwachen. 66.0% der teilnehmenden Heime setzen mindestens einen dieser Prozesse um, 34.0% setzen keinen der drei Prozesse um. Statistisch signifikante Unterschiede in der Umsetzung der Prozesse zeigten sich nach Standort des Pflegeheims, der Art des Dokumentationssystems für die Medikation, dem Arztmodell, der Anzahl externer Ärzte/Ärztinnen sowie dem Bezugskanal der Medikamente und der gesetzlichen Verpflichtung zur Zusammenarbeit mit Apothekern/Apothekerinnen. Keine Unterschiede zeigten sich nach Heimgröße.

Schlussfolgerung
In Schweizer Alters- und Pflegeheimen sind zentrale sicherheitsrelevante Medikationsprozesse noch nicht flächendeckend umgesetzt. Besonders in Einrichtungen, in denen viele externe Belegärzte Bewohnende betreuen, ist die Umsetzung noch wenig fortgeschritten. Die organisationalen Merkmale müssen für eine erfolgreiche Implementierung von Verbesserungsmassnahmen berücksichtigt werden.

Source
Zeitschrift für Evidenz, Fortbildung und Qualität im Gesundheitswesen

Autoren
Andrea Niederhauser, Dr. Lea Brühwiler, Dr. Liat Fishmann, Prof. Dr. David Schwappach der Stiftung Patientensicherheit Schweiz.

Abstract


Patientensicherheitsgefährdungen durch die Nutzung von IT in onkologischen Ambulatorien

Das Ziel der vorliegenden Studie von Dr. Yvonne Pfeiffer, Chantal Zimmermann und Prof. Dr. David Schwappach von Patientensicherheit Schweiz war, Patientensicherheitsgefährdungen, die bei der Nutzung von HIT (Health Information Technology) entstehen, zu identifizieren.

Zum einen wurden explorativ Patientensicherheitsgefährdungen in drei onkologischen Ambulatorien erfasst und übergeordnete Themen identifiziert. Zum anderen wurde systematisch die Anzahl an Informationsquellen erfasst, die die klinisch Tätigen nutzen müssen, um sich ein Bild vom Patienten zu machen. Dafür wurden Interviews und Beobachtungen mit je einer Pflegefachperson und einem Arzt durchgeführt.

Ergebnisse
Informationsmanagement-bezogene Patientensicherheitsgefährdungen waren in der täglichen Versorgung allgegenwärtig: ausgehend von 125 erfassten Patientensicherheitsgefährdungen wurden elf Themenfelder identifiziert. Drei waren besonders relevant für die Entwicklung eines adäquaten mentalen Modells über den Patienten der klinisch Tätigen: patientenbezogene Informationen wurden nicht an einem Ort, sondern häufig fragmentiert in verschiedenen HIT-Systemen verteilt gespeichert; trotz der Einführung von HIT blieb für bestimmte Informationen die Papierdokumentation bestehen, was den Zugriff darauf erschwerte und die Anzahl an relevanten Quellen erhöhte; die mangelnde Benutzerfreundlichkeit der HIT-Systeme machte es schwierig, zeitgerecht Patienteninformation abzurufen. Klinisch Tätige mussten zwischen fünf und elf Informationsquellen nutzen, um sich ein Bild über den Patienten zu machen.

Schlussfolgerungen
Gesamthaft zeigte sich, dass die Gestaltung der HIT-Systeme nur unzureichend an die Arbeitsprozesse angepasst ist und es nicht begünstigt, sich vollständig über einen Patienten zu informieren. Die identifizierten Themenfelder zeigen auf, wo zukünftige Systemgestaltung und -verbesserung ansetzen kann. Dabei ist es von großer Bedeutung, die eigentlichen Anforderungen der Arbeitsprozesse auf die Gestaltung der HIT abzustimmen und die tatsächliche Implementierung und Nutzung von HIT eng zu begleiten.

Source: ZEFQ Zeitschrift für Evidenz, Fortbildung und Qualität im Gesundheitswesen

Autoren: Dr. Yvonne Pfeiffer, Chantal Zimmermann, Prof. Dr. David Schwappach, Stiftung Patientensicherheit Schweiz

Abstract


Safe vincristine use in Switzerland: Still a long way to go?

Different international organizations recommend safety measures for the use of vincristine to prevent wrong route administrations. A central recommendation is to use infusion bags instead of syringes to prevent confusion with intrathecal chemotherapy. This study aimed to investigate the implementation of safety measures for vincristine and intrathecal chemotherapies in Switzerland.

Source:  Journal of Oncology Pharmacy Practice

Authors: Dr. Lea Brühwiler und Prof. Dr. David Schwappach, Stiftung Patientensicherheit Schweiz

Abstract


Prozessanalysen zugunsten der Patientensicherheit

Im Zentrum von Lean Healthcare steht die Optimierung von Prozessen und deren Ausrichtung auf die Patienten, um nicht-wertschöpfende Aktivitäten zu eliminieren. Die Gestaltung von Prozessen ist auch für die Verbesserung der Patientensicherheit zentral.

Im Kapitel «Patientensicherheit» des Buches «LHT-BOK Lean Healthcare Transformation Body of Knowledge» wird das Thema Patientensicherheit beleuchtet. Beispiele zeigen Schnittstellen zu Lean Healthcare auf.

Source:  A. Angerer (Hrsg.), LHT-BOK Lean Healthcare Transformation Body of Knowledge, Edition 2018–2019. Winterthur

Authors: Kobler, I. & Schwappach, D. (2018). Stiftung Patientensicherheit Schweiz


Patient Safety in Cancer Care

Cancer care has seen large successes in terms of increased survival rates and improvements in quality of life. However, despite these achievements, many patients suffer preventable harm from treatment. Studies of patient safety in cancer care have usually focused on chemotherapy safety and have been conducted in large centers. These studies reveal that errors are more frequent in more complex therapies and that about 1-3% of adult and pediatric patients are affected by chemotherapy errors 1.

Source: eonsmagazine Winter/Spring 2019

Authors: Prof. Dr. David Schwappach


Speaking Up about Patient Safety in Perioperative Care: Differences between Academic and Nonacademic Hospitals in Austria and Switzerland

Purpose of the Study: In perioperative care, communication about patient safety concerns is both difficult and valuable. Research into speaking up has mostly been conducted in single countries; the aim of this study was to compare speaking up-related climate and behaviors in academic and nonacademic hospitals.

Source: Journal of Investigative Surgery

Authors: David Schwappach from Swiss Patient Safety Foundation, Zurich, Switzerland, Gerald Sendlhofer from Executive Department for Quality and Risk Management, Landeskrankenhaus-Universitatsklinikum Graz, Graz, Austria and Division of Plastic, Aesthetic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Research Unit for Safety in Health, Medizinische Universitat Graz, Graz, Austria

Abstract


Etikettierung von Laborröhrchen: ein komplexer Prozess mit hoher Fehleranfälligkeit

Fehler bei der Etikettierung von Laborproben treten in Gesundheitseinrichtungen immer wieder auf und werden häufig in Bericht – und Lernsystemen (CIRS) beschrieben. Die Analyse dieser CIRS-Berichte stellt die Verantwortlichen aufgrund der Komplexität des Prozesses der Etikettierung von Laborproben vor verschiedene Herausforderungen.

Der Prozess der Etikettierung der Probengefäße und der dazugehörigen Auftragsformulare ist in den Spitälern sehr heterogen organisiert. Uneinheitliche oder fehlende definierte Prozessabläufe führen dazu, dass Probengefäße und dazugehörige Auftragsformulare falsch oder gar nicht etikettiert werden. Um zu untersuchen, welche Fehler bei der Etikettierung von Laborproben auftreten und was zu ihrer Detektion führt, wurden die Fehlerberichte von 42 Schweizer Spitälern des CIRRNET-Netzwerks (Critical Incident Reporting & Reacting NETwork) systematisch analysiert.

Source: Zeitschrift für Evidenz, Fortbildung und Qualität im Gesundheitswesen

Authors: Dr. Olga Frank und Carmen Kerker-Specker, Stiftung Patientensicherheit Schweiz

Abstract


Implications of involving pharmacy technicians in obtaining a best possible medication history from the perspectives of pharmaceutical, medical and nursing staff: a qualitative study

Andrea Niederhauser, Chantal Zimmermann, Liat Fishman, David L B Schwappach, BMJ Open 2018;8:e020566. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2017-020566


Assessment of the safety climate in outpatient diagnostic services: Development and psychometric evaluation of a questionnaire

Safe practice and safety culture are important issues in outpatient diagnostic imaging services. As questionnaires assessing safety culture through the measurement of safety climate in this setting are not yet available, the present study aimed to develop and validate such an instrument.

 

Conclusions

The final instrument presents a valid, consistent and reliable option to measure safety climate in outpatient diagnostic imaging services. Results can be used as a basis for quality improvement.

Key Points

• An adapted questionnaire that assesses safety climate in outpatient diagnostic imaging services was developed and tested in Switzerland.

• Psychometric evaluation showed the questionnaire to be a valid, consistent and reliable instrument.

• Results are of interest for imaging services as well as for stakeholders interested more globally in monitoring and quality improvement

Authors

Marianne Jossen, Fabio Valeri, Christina Heilmaier, David Schwappach

Source
Springer Link, European Radiology

Abstract


 


Medikationssicherheit: Wo steht die Schweiz?

Empirische Analysen zeigen, dass die Medikationssicherheit ein aktueller und drängender Problembereich der Schweizer Gesundheitsversorgung ist. Unerwünschte Arzneimittelereignisse und Medikationsfehler kommen häufig vor und Risiken wie die der Polypharmazie sind weitverbreitet.

 

Abstract
Es gibt in der Schweiz keine umfassende nationale Strategie, die sich explizit der Medikationssicherheit widmet. Der Föderalismus mit relativer Autonomie der Kantone bei den Gesetzen der Gesundheitsversorgung beeinflusst die Umsetzung nationaler Reformen im Gesundheitswesen, auch zum Nachteil der Arzneimitteltherapiesicherheit. Eine Besonderheit der Schweiz ist die direkte ärztliche Medikamentenabgabe, die in fast allen Deutschschweizer Kantonen erlaubt ist und spezifische Herausforderungen für die Medikationssicherheit impliziert. Gleichwohl existieren zunehmend Aktivitäten auf nationaler Ebene, die verschiedene Aspekte der Medikationssicherheit behandeln, wie die „progress!“-Programme im Rahmen der nationalen Qualitätsstrategie. Im Nationalen Forschungsprogramm „Gesundheitsversorgung“ (NFP 74) des Schweizer Nationalfonds bearbeiten mehrere Forschungsprojekte aktuell das Thema Medikationssicherheit. Klinisch-pharmazeutische Aktivitäten in Krankenhäusern sind verhältnismäßig weitverbreitet. Die pharmazeutische Betreuung (Pharmaceutical Care) in der Grundversorgung und die entsprechenden Kompetenzen für Apotheker werden ausgebaut. Dennoch braucht es eine gesamtheitliche Strategie, Prioritätensetzung und Wirksamkeitsprüfung unter Einbindung aller Stakeholder, damit das Schweizer Gesundheitswesen den Herausforderungen, die sich für die Medikationssicherheit stellen, zukunftsgerichtet begegnen kann.

Autoren
Liat Fishman, Lea Brühwiler, David Schwappach

Quelle
Springer Link/Bundesgesunheitsblatt - Gesundheitsforschung - Gesundheitsschutz

 


Nurses’ and Physicians’ Perceptions of Indwelling Urinary Catheter Practices and Culture in Their Institutions

Objectives Indwelling urinary catheters (IUCs) are commonly used devices in acute care that may lead to catheter-associated urinary tract infections or noninfectious complications. Responsibilities for IUC are usually shared between nurses and physicians, and a common mental model among the two professional groups is thus essential for a successful reduction in catheter use. The aim of this study was to determine variation in the perceptions of current practices and culture regarding IUC use between these two groups.

Results
Nurses and physicians each have their own tasks but also share responsibilities for catheter placement, care, and removal. Overall, nurses were more positive than physicians about current practices and culture regarding IUC use within their institution (mean scale scores = 5.4 for nurses versus 5.1 for physicians, P < 0.001). Perceptions of the two professional groups diverged most strongly on practices to avoid unnecessary placement of IUCs, the presence of shared values and attitudes in support of restrictive catheter use, and the other group's leadership commitment.

Autors
Niederhauser, Andrea, MPH*; Züllig, Stephanie, PhD*; Marschall, Jonas, MD†‡; Schwappach, David LB, PhD*§ progress! Safe Urinary Catheterization Collaboration Group

Source
Journal of Patient Safety: May 29, 2018 - Volume Publish Ahead of Print - Issue - p